New publication:Multi drug and extended spectrum beta-lactamase resistant Escherichia coli isolated from a dairy farm

We are really very excited that our first paper on antimicrobial resistance in agriculture has been published. This is experimental work, carried out by Delveen Ibrahim in Jon Hobman and Chris Dodd’s laboratories, characterising AMR E. coli strains from the slurry tank of a dairy farm.

Ibrahim DR, Dodd CER, Stekel DJ, Ramsden SJ and Hobman JL (2016). Multi drug and extended spectrum beta-lactamase resistant Escherichia coli isolated from a dairy farm. FEMS Microbial Ecology DOI:10.1093/femsec/fiw013.

Abstract

Escherichia coli strains were isolated from a single dairy farm as a sentinel organism for the persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in the farm environment. Selective microbiological media were used to isolate 126 E. coli isolates from slurry and faeces samples from different farm areas. Antibiotic resistance profiling for 17 antibiotics (seven antibiotic classes), showed 57.9% of the isolates were resistant to between 3 and 15 antibiotics. The highest frequency of resistance was to ampicillin (56.3%), and the lowest to imipenem (1.6%), which appeared to be an unstable phenotype and was subsequently lost. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase resistance (ESBL) was detected in 53 isolates and blaCTX-M, blaTEM and blaOXA genes were detected by PCR in twelve, four and two strains, respectively. Phenotypically most isolates showing resistance to cephalosporins were AmpC rather than ESBL, a number of isolates having both activities. Phenotypic resistance patterns suggested co-acquisition of some resistance genes within subsets of the isolates. Genotyping using ERIC PCR demonstrated these were not clonal, and therefore co-resistance may be associated with mobile genetic elements. These data show a snapshot of diverse resistance genes present in the E. coli population reservoir, including resistance to historically used antibiotics as well as cephalosporins in contemporary use.

 

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