PhD opportunity: Tunable zinc responsive bacterial promoters for controlled gene expression

 

Tunable zinc responsive bacterial promoters for controlled gene expression

Supervisory Team: Dr Jon Hobman (School of Biosciences), Dr Phil Hill (School of Biosciences), Dr Dov Stekel (School of Biosciences).

Applications are invited for this 4-year PhD project which is part of a University-funded Doctoral Training Programme (DTP) in Synthetic Biology and associated with Nottingham’s new BBSRC/EPSRC Synthetic Biology Research Centre. Students will benefit from a diverse range of training opportunities, including specialist workshops, lectures and seminars, as well as participation in Nottingham’s yearly BBSRC DTP Spring School event.

Zinc is an essential metal, required in ~30% of bacterial proteins, but is toxic at higher intracellular concentrations. Bacteria such as E. coli have evolved sophisticated zinc import and export systems controlled by transcription factors that repress the expression of genes encoding importer proteins (regulator Zur) or activate expression of zinc efflux (regulator ZntR). These regulators and the promoters they control represent a good example of fine tuning of cellular response to external zinc concentrations (1) and different Zur and ZntR regulated promoters have different affinities and transcription levels. The aim of this PhD will be to study the levels of expression from engineered Zur and ZntR regulated promoters in response to zinc, so that a suite of promoters can be used to finely control gene expression in response to zinc levels in growth media. These promoters will be used to control gene expression in engineered bacteria using cheap zinc inducers and zinc chelators, and will allow tuned expression of industrially useful synthetic pathways in E. coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. These tunable promoters could have potential impact in a range of biotechnology/biosynthesis contexts.

The project is available from 1st October 2016 and is open to UK and EU students with a 2(i) degree or above in microbiology, genetics, biochemistry, or a related discipline. The work will be based at the School of Biosciences in Nottingham.

The supervision team for this project is multi-disciplinary, enabling training in a wide-range of subjects and techniques in microbiology, molecular biology, cell engineering, reporter gene systems, mathematical modelling, data analysis, and cell metabolism.

Applicants should submit a covering letter, CV and the names of two academic referees addressed to: Rob Johnston School Administrator Robert.Johnston@nottingham.ac.uk

Closing date for applications: 31st July 2016

Informal enquiries to Dr Jon Hobman ( Jon.Hobman@nottingham.co.uk )

(1)       Takahashi et al (2015). Journal of the Royal Society Interface 12: 20150069

 

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