Welcome to Michelle Baker and Henry Todman

We are delighted to welcome two new lab members this month, Michelle Baker and Henry Todman. Both Michelle and Henry are joint appointments with the School of Mathematics, co-supervised with Theo Kypraios.

Michelle has rejoined our lab, following a post-doc with Jamie Twycross and Liz Sockett. Michelle’s previous stint with us was very productive, leading to our first AMR slurry modelling paper, which I am sure contributed to our grant success. Michelle will be with us for two years. Michelle writes:

I am a post-doctoral researcher in the field of mathematical biology, and am particularly interested in the study of bacteria and antibiotic resistance. I work in the EVAL-FARMS project using mathematical modelling to investigate the risk of emergence of antibiotic resistance from agricultural slurries. This interdisciplinary project allows me to work alongside experts from a wide range of disciplines to tackle the problem in an integrated way and to produce high quality research.

I completed my PhD in Mathematics here at the University of Nottingham, focussed on cytokine dynamics in arthritic disease. After completing my PhD I took up a research position supervised by Prof Liz Sockett and Dr Jamie Twycross, investigating the potential of predatory bacteria to be used as ‘living antibiotics’.

Henry Todman has joined us as a four year PhD student associated with the EVAL-FARMS project. Henry writes:

I am a mathematical modelling PhD student working with Dov, Theo Kypraios and Michelle Baker. My PhD research will primarily look at developing new mathematical models to assess the risks of bacterial population carrying antimicrobial resistance genes and fitting these models to experimental data produced from the EVAL-FARMS project. 

Prior to beginning my PhD, I studied Mathematics at the University of Warwick for my undergraduate degree, and also completed an MSc in Mathematical Medicine and Biology at the University of Nottingham. Over the course of my MSc I was exposed to a wide range of current research topics in mathematical biology, however, it was antimicrobial resistance that immediately captured my interest. This led me to complete my dissertation on the phage-mediated spread of AMR, and I am now eager to pursue this topic even further in my PhD.

Outside of work, I am a keen climber and you will often find me hanging off some rock in the Peak District, or taking part in bouldering competitions around the country.

 

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