Research projects gain value from external advisory boards

On Monday we had our first External Advisory Board meeting for our EVAL-FARMS AMR project. We have a good number of external advisors, representing industrial, policy and academic stake-holders. It is also the first time I have led a project with an external board. My reactions are:

  1. We had a very successful and enjoyable event. Our external advisors are, of course, lovely, interesting, intelligent and successful people from a wide range of backgrounds, so it was a pleasure to spend time with them.
  2. We now have a broad perspective of input into our project. We are no longer a group of academics talking to each other – we are now a group of academics also in conversation with the broader outside world – giving real context for our work and its impact to other sectors – and helping us to ensure appropriate outputs, messages and impact into their sectors.
  3. We have a group of people who will hold us to account. We need to stay on track and stay relevant!
  4. When I look back on previously held research funding, especially the Lux and Biolog projects, I can see now how much an external board would have helped us to run the projects better. I wish we had had them!
  5. In future, I will look towards having external boards for all research projects. EVAL-FARMS is especially applied and outward facing, so it makes sense to have many non-academic partners. But even a project which is entirely fundamental science would benefit from an external board of academic and other beneficiaries.
  6. We look forward to our next advisory board meeting in September 2017, as well as interactions with members of our board before then.

Birmingham-Nottingham Strategic Collaboration Fund awarded

We are delighted that the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have awarded a Strategic Collaboration Fund award to Josh Rappoportand myself. The project is titled “Experimental analysis and modeling of occludin trafficking during epithelial polarization and wound healing”. We will be looking at the modelling end, developing an ODE model and fitting to data from Josh’s lab using Monte Carlo techniques. The funding awarded is £20,000 and we will be looking for a short-term post-doctoral research fellow for a two month period to carry out the work – to start at some point in 2013 (further details to be posted).

We are very much looking forward to collaborating with Josh and others on this project.